Understanding the science of communication and how it affects our self-perception is the key to understanding the experience of women in the workplace. The more we know about how we communicate with others, the better able we are to work together and avoid common disconnects. The 9th annual Women for WineSense Winemaking & Viticulture Roundtable event, “The Science of Communication: Avoiding Common Disconnects” is designed to provide women with information about the science of communication and learn how to apply that knowledge to their daily interactions with others.

At the GVWC meeting earlier this month, we were joined by two wine educators who are familiar with the challenges and benefits of effective communication. A key part of the conversation was the topic of unspoken assumptions between parties. The goal of this webinar was to learn from each other, as well as to learn how to communicate effectively with others.

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NAPA / SONOMA, CALIFORNIA | 3. June 2021: Wednesday the 9th. On June 20, 2021 from 3:30-5:00 pm, the Napa | Sonoma Chapter (WWS) of Women for Winemaking and Viticulture will present the Science of Communication Roundtable:  Breaking codes and preventing common communication problems.is an interactive webinar with communication expert, trainer and author Jeanie Whitehouse.  The goal is to help participants identify their own communication style and get practical tips for understanding others.

ON THETHING:

Admission begins at 3:20 pm and the actual webinar begins at 3:30 pm with announcements, followed by an interactive presentation with Q&A in the chat room.

As Whitehouse promises, you’ll learn why a former boss never reads more than the first line of an email, why some people take longer to make a decision, and how to deal with both.   You will leave this session with a new understanding of the connections you make with others in your professional and personal life.

Roundtable Chair Julie Lamgeir noted: We are pleased to have Geni join our roundtable.  She is a fantastic communication coach and has extensive experience working with all cross-functional leaders and business owners in our industry. She continued: To be heard, you need to know yourself and your audience and how to effectively build that bridge.  That’s why the core exercise of this communication webinar is one of the best assessment diagnostics recommended by our HR experts at the Career and Competency Development Roundtable in January 2021.  Deepening this area with Geni is a strategic next step for the benefit of our members.

ON THE SPEAKER

Geni Whitehouse, CPA.CITP, CSPM, divides her time between working as a wine consultant for Brotemarkle, Davis & Co. in Napa Valley, working with www.TheImpactfulAdvisor.com to promote the accounting profession, and writing, speaking, and tweeting at EvenANerd.com.

In her position at BDCo, she regularly teaches financial concepts to members of the Napa Valley Vintners, an organization representing more than 500 wineries in the Napa Valley. He has spoken at the Wine Industry Technology Symposium, the United Wine and Grape Symposium, the major Women for WineSense event, and has moderated numerous wine industry panels. For the second time, she is a speaker at the Bottles Brews & Buds conference hosted by the Washington CPA Society in August.

She teaches finance for the wine industry at WISE Academy and Sonoma State University and co-founded Solve Services, a remote accounting company for the wine industry.

She is a frequent keynote speaker at CPA and technology conferences across the country and has been named one of the 100 Most Influential People by Accounting Today, one of the 25 Thought Leaders in Accounting by CPA Practice Advisor and one of the 25 Most Influential Women in Accounting. She was on the organizing committee of TEDxNapaValley and was the first speaker at their inaugural event.  His book How to make a boring subject interesting: 52 Ways to Make Even a Nerd Listen can be found online.

RSVP DETAILS :

This event is free to active WWS members at the professional level.  Other participants can also participate in the event for a fee.  The login for the personal zoom will be sent to the participants by e-mail.  To register as an active WWS professional member or for questions about this or future WWS roundtable meetings on wine and viticulture, please contact the President ([email protected]).

Lay people and members of the WWS can also attend the event, provided they pay their admission in advance.  Contact Hilary Silva, Director of the Napa|Sonoma Chapter Roundtable ([email protected]) to participate and for a separate link with details.

ON THE ROUND TABLE ON WINE GROWING AND WINE PRODUCTION

The WWS Roundtable meets approximately six times a year, with a break for harvest.  During the pandemic, the events were held online and after harvest in 2021, they will continue with more festivities at participating wineries, with additional virtual capabilities for greater accessibility for attendees.

Ms. Lamgeir notes: The themes of our recent meetings were the professional skills and knowledge that winemakers need, but which are not always easy to acquire in their daily work.

She went on to explain: The programs, which took place from spring 2020 through the pandemic at top wineries in Napa and Sonoma, were a fantastic opportunity for the more than 100 participating women winemakers and grape growers to connect directly with experts they might not otherwise have met for personal advice and to ask questions in a friendly professional forum.  Our speakers include many of the world’s leading writers, critics and editors, leading academics, international sensory consultants, sommeliers, media coaches, CFOs and CEOs in roundtable discussions, international wine and viticulture colleagues, industry career coaches and top recruiters.

ON OTHER WWS ROUNDTABLES  The eight active WWS roundtables provide a welcoming and confidential atmosphere for bi-monthly or quarterly meetings among small groups of colleagues. Club members network, give each other advice and support, and organize educational events by inviting speakers in their field to discuss current issues that club members face in their daily work. Numerous roundtable discussions were held for WWS representatives on the topics of finance, accounting, human resources, winemaking/wine growing and marketing/consumerism.

The Napa/Sonoma Chapter currently has over 400 members, 80% of whom are wine professionals. To participate or learn more about WWS roundtables, visit www.womenforwinesense.org.  For information on other WWS roundtables for additional functions outside the wine and viticulture industry, contact Hilary Silva, Napa|Sonoma Chapter roundtable director ([email protected]).

ON WOMEN FOR SALAD DRESSING

WWS is a national 501(c)6 non-profit organization.  Founded in 1990, the Napa|Sonoma Chapter is the founding chapter of this national organization that provides exceptional educational and networking opportunities for wine industry professionals and wine lovers by hosting educational, informative and challenging events in a welcoming and fun environment.  Men and women of all ages are welcome.  Numerous in-person and virtual events are planned for 2021 and 2022.

To join or learn more, visit www.womenforwinesense.org.

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